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Various swing the jingle


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Jamie & Emma wake up London every weekday morning from 6am with the best variety of music, mixed together with the biggest showbiz guests and fantastic giveaways.

Unlike 1960, when the albums were released in a haphazard fashion relative to the catalog numbers, albums in the 800s were more-or-less orderly in release.

March, 1963, was another time of logo change for King. Albums released before March, 1963, had the old "King High Fidelity" rectangular logo. By April, 1953, King had switched to the well-known ornate crown with "KING" beneath it (as shown at the top of this page). In March, King experimented with several logos before deciding which one it wanted to adopt. Many albums (., 806, 813, 814, 816) issued in March, 1963, had the old rectangular logo. Some (., 812, 819) had a logo that just said "KING" with no additional graphics. Another had "KING" with a small crown on top (., 807, 817, 827). Yet another transitional experimental logo had the shape of the ornate crown as was eventually adopted, but the crown was blank with "KING" inside (., 809, 815). And album 821 had the ornate crown that was eventually the winner in the logo sweepstakes. Albums released after March, 1963, all had the ornate crown logo.


The mono label for the albums in the 800s (far left) was the same as it had been throughout the 1960s, with the large letters. Promotional labels (near left) were unusual, but were white with black print with the same graphics. The stereo label used for the 800s (far left) was the same as had been used since 1958, with the blue label with silver print and large letters curving around the top of the label. In early 1966, King changed the design of the stereo label (near left) to use a logo with straight letters with a crown on top. This label appears on later pressings of albums in the 800s, but it is thought the 800s albums with this label date from early 1966 or later.


We would appreciate any additions or corrections to this discography. Just send them to us via e-mail . Both Sides Now Publications is an information web page. We are not a catalog, nor can we provide the records listed below. We have no association with King Records, which is currently owned by Gusto. Should you want to contact Gusto, or should you be interested in acquiring albums listed in this discography (which are all out of print), we suggest you see our Frequently Asked Questions page and Follow the instructions found there. This story and discography are copyright 1998, 1999, 2012 by Mike Callahan.

Actually, this was one of Time- Life's most popular sets, having been reissued at least three times since its introduction in the early 1970s (see below). This may be surprising to some, since the music on these box sets is not the original big band masters heard on the radio or purchased on record in the 1930s and 1940s. Instead, the music here is a recreation of big band songs, performed by Billy May & His Orchestra and the Glen Gray Casa Loma Orchestra recording for Capitol Records in the 1960s and early 1970s. What the sets do have going for them, however, is that these new recordings are in modern high quality stereo sound, unlike the pre-CD scratchy mono low-fidelity 78s that were used for mastering most compilations in the 1970s and 1980s. And the stereo remakes were fairly faithful to the original sounds. Actually, these recordings are much closer to what one actually heard and experienced being at a dance in the 1930s and 1940s with a big band, since the 1930s/1940s vintage recordings did not do the bands justice.

But Artie Shaw, for one, was not amused at these offerings, which purported to include "Artie Shaw Versions" although he had not played a note on them, and consequently he would receive no royalties. He sued Time-Life for foisting fake versions off on the public, supposedly damaging his reputation and causing him great pain and humiliation, but he eventually lost the court case. Later, perhaps as part of a peace offering, Time-Life put out a Big Band series, which DID have the original versions, including Shaw's original recordings, from which he would collect royalties.

The first covers to the box sets were black and white. Boxes were issued through a subscription, with one volume being issued per quarter or so. After the initial issue, Time-Life redesigned the cover to make them more modern and lively. Time-Life reissued all the volumes with the new color covers starting in the mid-1970s. These box sets were also originally released in Canada and the UK with an "STA-" prefix and same catalog numbers as the "STL-" prefix boxes issued in the . The series was manufactured by Capitol Records' Special Markets Division, so the vinyl was also first rate.


Original covers were black and white with a color spine, with each volume showing a couple in various poses dancing in a white circle. As the series became very popular, Time-Life redesigned the covers, using a color cover (with the same color as the spines were originally), with the dancing couple released from the confinement of the circle that they were in previously. Booklets inside these two issues were identical in most cases.

Labels for each volume used different colors; although the same label design layout was used for each volume in the series, the individual labels were black on top with a color matching the box set cover on the bottom.

Later, in the late 1970s, the set was reissued, but with beige covers and matching beige labels. The dancing couple on the cover was still retained for these issues, but they were shuffled from the first set, as dancing couples seen on one volume in the early set were now on a different volume. By the mid 1980s, the set was reissued with a completely revamped design, this time with silver covers and matching silver labels, with only a dancing couple drawn in a logo instead of the pictures used in previous incarnations.

We would appreciate any additions or corrections to this discography. Just send them to us via e-mail . Both Sides Now Publications is an information web page. We are not a catalog, nor can we provide the records listed below. We have no association with Time-Life or Warner Bros. Records. Should you be interested in acquiring albums listed in this discography (all of which are out of print), we suggest you see our Frequently Asked Questions page and follow the instructions found there. This story and discography are copyright 2004, 2008 by Mike Callahan.

In 1947 she married a white bandleader, Lennie Hayton, a marriage that was kept secret for three years because of racial pressures. Until his death in 1971, Hayton was also her pianist, arranger, conductor, and manager.


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